Is Millionaire Biz Pro a Scam? A Very Blatant One!

 

millionaire biz pro logo

Millionaire Biz Pro
Overall Score: 3/10
Founder: Derek Maxwell
Price: $47 + $34.95/month, many upsells
Website: millionairebizpro.com

It’s time for another review! This time I’m looking at Millionaire Biz Pro, a program brought to my attention on social media. Can it really make you $1000 a day? Let’s find out!

What is Millionaire Biz Pro?


On the surface, Millionaire Biz Pro (or MBP) looks like yet another overhyped internet marketing training program that promises to make its users rich, with thousands of dollars in commissions a day.

judge a book by its cover
In MBP’s case, it has the body of the right carrot and the head of the left one.

But as we look deeper, past the cover, we see that MBP… is actually another overhyped marketing program that promises its users outlandish riches.

That’s not all though. MBP is the most blatant scam I’ve seen thus far, even outranking Work at Home Institute. Well, I wouldn’t go that far, but it’s still pretty insulting.

MBP, created by Derek Maxwell, is based around email marketing, focusing on building lists through landing pages and marketing to the subscribers. A legit strategy, but does MBP pull it off?

This review will tell you all you need to know! Put your scam goggles on and let’s do this!

Note: MBP costs $47 on the main site, but it can be as low as $17.

Millionaire Biz Pro at a Glance


Let’s start out with MBP’s presentation. I start with the website here because it’s the most egregiously scammy part of the program.

Check out the main page of the website:

millionaire biz pro main page

It’s a landing page with a video. You can only pause it though. There’s no other function.

The video basically shows you some testimonials, hype, that sorta thing. It seems like any other landing page, till you look again.

First, the “closing” date. As you can see, I was somehow lucky enough to write this review on the same day MBP is supposed to close! How coincidental is that?
mbp fake dates

This is an urgency tactic, that makes unsuspecting victims more likely to buy in right away. The truth is, the date at the top just changes at midnight.

You’ll notice that MBP is looking for “45 7 people” Do you really believe this was made for only 45 people? Gimme a break. This is another scam tactic.

The Video

Now, the video… the video is where it gets good. It even got its own heading, you see.

Here’s a frame from the video:

derek maxwell fake video

So apparently this special program is only available to a few people. You can see how dishonest this statement is. False exclusivity? That’s scam tactics 101.

This junk is most certainly not reserved. It’s on YouTube, for crying out loud! The only reason I don’t embed it here is because it’s a private video. That doesn’t mean “reserved,” it means you need a link to see it.

You might be tempted by the personal testimonial provided in the flick. Hey, I used to fall for them myself. They really add weight to a product’s legitimacy.

Too bad “success stories” like “Megan Elizabeth Erie” are fake. If we hop on over to Fiverr, we can simply search “video testimonial” for a surprising (not!) find.

fiverr testimonials
Whoa, HD! I personally hate 480p scams.

Well, looky here! That’s the same woman! She’s an actor who does this for a living!

I’m not knocking Tamerak here. She’s obviously good at what she does. But MBP is using blatantly false advertising in the landing video. She even says she’s never filmed herself before in the video!

And I just noticed there’s even a “testimonials” category on Fiverr! You can’t trust these things, reader.

Why would Derek Maxwell hire actors if his product was so good? That rings some alarm bells for me.

Oh, and it only takes about 20 seconds or so before another red flag pops up:

fiverr fake testimonials mbp
How little of a budget did they have?

Yes folks, apparently two women with the same name and home state had success with MBP!

Seriously, they’re not even trying.

All this trickery should be enough to convince you. But in case you still aren’t, have a look at the “training.”

How Does Millionaire Biz Pro Work?


MBP works on a simple concept: using landing pages to grow an email list, then marketing affiliate links to that list after they’ve subscribed. It costs $47 to start, then $34.95/month.

This is honestly a legit strategy. Many marketers do it. But can you earn $1000 a day just by doing it right off the bat?

I don’t think so. Here’s a summary of what MBP does, straight from the horse’s mouth:

millionaire bix pro terms

When you sign up (for $47), you’re able to get up to 15 landing pages to promote with.

MBP basically uses a marketplace called ClickBetter to find products for you to promote with your landing pages. ClickBetter is similar to ClickBank, only it has higher commissions on average.

So far so good, right? Only that’s pretty much it. You’re left with the landing page. What are you supposed to do to get traffic?

Getting traffic is something you absolutely need to know how to do, and it’s absolutely the hardest part of running a website, in my opinion. You get all these fancy webpages, cool. Then what?

Like many products of its ilk, MBP just leaves you in the dark. It’s clearly designed to take advantage of rookies who don’t know any better.

The landing pages themselves are nothing special. They work, I’ll give them that. They also look kinda slick.

mbp landing page scam
You can tell the product here is useless. The email is what’s important.

The pages also have an affiliate link, so the user could buy an item and subscribe at the same time. The links take them to other scam sales pages. The products are usually cheap PLR nonsense. The punishment fits the crime.

That didn’t make any sense, did it?

But it does bring me to something else. MBP is basically giving out copies of websites. Google is penalizing duplicate content. Sooner or later, that dead website will be even dead-er!

Loathsome Landing Pages! The MBP Verdict


Okay, I will admit that you *could* build a business with Millionaire Biz Pro.

But you will *never* do so. Chances are, if you fall for MBP, you’re a newbie, so you won’t have any experience in online business, which means you won’t be able to get any traffic.

mbp scam video
Do I really need to say it?

Even if you somehow manage to get traffic, there’s no way you’ll earn 1000 smackers in a day. That takes months to years of hard work.

That’s why I’m gonna have to say this is a scam. There’s simply too much evidence against it. Derek Maxwell wants your cash, not to share his “secret” with you. He’s selling a dream.

The truth is, you could be earning money with this, and it’d still be a scam, because all of the advertising is hype! The testimonials are performed by actors, for goodness’ sake. What more proof do you need?

MBP allows refunds for up to 60 days. I add that here because it’s the only good thing about it.

Unless you insist on believing it’s possible to quickly make $1000 a day from an investment of $47, then MBP is not for you.

There are many ways to make money online, and most of those ways require investment, both of time and of hard work.

A Better Alternative

One thing MBP did get right is the focus on affiliate marketing. It is indeed a great way to earn money online. You basically promote other people’s products for a share of the revenue.

But it doesn’t have to be at all what MBP is. I used to believe that affiliate marketing was just for programs like MBP, until I encountered my #1 Super Program, Wealthy Affiliate.

Right when I joined for free, I was given 2 websites. No, not landing pages. Full and optimized WordPress websites. But that wasn’t the best part.

The best part was the training. Step by step, teaching me all I needed to know about internet marketing. I went from falling for “get rich quick” scams to owning a complete and monetized site.

WA isn’t hyped. In fact, it’s known for its slow pace. That’s kinda why many frustrated customers lash out at it. After trash like MBP keeps spreading the (false) message that quick money is out there, people start to get made that it actually isn’t.

You have 3 choices now that you know MBP isn’t worth your time:

  1. You could keep looking for more scams, hoping to get lucky one day, after losing more money. I did that for a while.
  2. You could give up online business altogether. I almost did that myself. Too many scams. But then I found WA.
  3. You could join WA for free and see for yourself if you can handle online business.

I highly suggest the 3rd one!

Check Out My #1 Super Program Here!

What do you think of MBP? Is it as big of a scam as I say it is? Have any questions about it? Want a career as a Fiverr actor? Leave a comment down below with your thoughts!

Your teammate in testimonials,

-Makki

 

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16 thoughts on “Is Millionaire Biz Pro a Scam? A Very Blatant One!

  1. Hi, and thanks for sharing information about MBP.

    I would never join a program like this. I think you’re absolutely right. It’s a scam. They hire actresses to do the testimonials. That ring a bell for me. I agree with you. Derek Maxwell just wants our cash. He doesn’t want me to succeed in the online business.
    I am searching for alternatives to do honest work on the internet and make money as well. This program will just give me headaches not the cash.

  2. I would have to agree with you Mohammad. It’s a scam, MBP seems to follow that path of most others of it’s ilk. That is they try to show you just enough to look legit.

    But even just a small closer inspection reveals all is not what it seems and they just rip you off. It’s almost tragic that people fall for this stuff, but they do. So keep up the good work of exposing as many of these types of scams as you can and offer a better alternative to invest in.

    1. Hi Adrian! You got the strategy pretty down pat. At first glance MBP does look kinda believable, but the more you look, the more it gets obvious that you’re looking at a scam. Usually, “scam” is kinda subjective, but in MBP’s case it totally fits. Sadly, dreams are powerful, which is why people believe this stuff a lot.

  3. Hey there =)

    I was suspicious of MBP, and your review confirmed my doubts. If I’m going to be totally honest, I have to say I love the layout of your product review as it is well organized and so easy to dissect the info.

    Thanks again for ringing the alarm bells on this scam.

    You are a master scam detector! =D

    Thanks!

  4. Hey Makki,

    Thanks for all of the information about Millionaire Bizpro! I haven’t even heard of it but I am glad I heard about it from you first. I thought it was pretty interesting that you showed us how shaky the advertising is for this scammy business.
    I learned a lot about the type of things that are common with business scams from this post, so thank you for that too. You convey the importance of doing thorough research before “buying” into businesses that may sound too good to be true. Where in the world can you easily make $1000 a day from just $47 that quickly? I love the little quirky “mess-ups” that you found at MBP. Did you buy the program and go through it? Do they offer a refund? Just curious!
    Great Review!

    1. If you don’t know much about how online scams work, just take note of how MBP works. You’ll be a pro in no time. But for the record, MBP does indeed have a 60-day return policy. I’ve added that into the review.

      Research is the only way to make sure you aren’t getting scammed. I’ve been in situations where I desperately wanted a product not to be a scam, so I bought, only to find that it actually was a scam. If it’s too good to be true, it is exactly that. Thanks for reading, Mallory!

  5. I admit it. I got sucked into this one before I found my current training program. It seemed all easy and everything, but then there was this pushy person who asked all these terribly personal questions and made me feel like I was scum of the earth. It took a few of my dollars before I figured out that it was a total scam! Wish I had seen your review before I joined up!

    1. Hey Kathy, sorry that you fell into the MBP trap. It’s a lesson for next time, I suppose. I think nearly everyone gets scammed at least once online, especially if they’re looking to make money. It sounds like the phone guy wanted to gauge your wallet so he could upsell you. Just terrible. Hopefully your current program is a different story!

  6. Well…. you sure told them. LOL Thanks for the review. I take it your pretty tired of all the hype like the rest of us. It does get pretty bad with some of those out there. And you’re right, it’s the old “If it sounds to good to be true, it probable is” routine. They make claims of quick riches, they get a thumbs down from me right off the bat.

  7. Always good to come across the findings of a scam website out there. You have feel sorry for those fall for the trap, although these scammers are professionals and are very convincing at what they do.

    Keep up the good work revealing the bad guys!

  8. Makki, tell us what you really think! Lol. I’m kidding.

    Honestly, I’m amazed at how many of these kinds of things are out there. I suppose I shouldn’t be. I do hope that people do the diligence to look for resources like this before they jump ahead and spend their time and money on something like this.

    This line from your article says everything I need to see: “So apparently this special program is only available to a few people. You can see how dishonest this statement is. False exclusivity? That’s scam tactics 101.”

    Agree 100%. Slimy. I really don’t need to see anything else to know it’s not for me.

    Your site is going to help a lot of people, Makki. Keep it up!

    Best wishes,

    Kevin

    1. False exclusivity is the worst! Why would anyone be “exclusive” to something they just stumbled upon? They didn’t do anything! But some people like being flattered…

      It’s great that you don’t need much more proof. Some people outright refuse to accept a scam as a scam, simply because they hope it won’t be. Hopefully, they’ll research before buying into Maxwell’s sweet talk. Thanks for sharing, Kevin! Always a pleasure to hear from you!

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